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One Day of Many




On the seventy-fifth anniversary of D-Day, a blog from a fellow historian has me wondering about how we communicate to the next generation the meaning of war and conflict. How do we show them that there is a process to determine whether or not a war is needed or just wanted?

Explaining World War II and D-Day is relatively easy… good versus evil. Nazis, Imperialists, and Fascists wanted to rule the world. D-Day began the final crusade to destroy the evil. But how does that translate to today? Or does it?

And when looking for a single moment to define the idea of war and sacrifice, what can we see? 


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Sounds Fishy to Me




If it sounds like it’s a bit dusty in here this morning, just know that this morning is the first day of 3rd Grade. While it’s great to be back in the “normal” routine, it’s also a bit more emotional than I ever imagined it would be.

We start with an allegory that helps makes my overall point today. Hat tip to the Veterans Political Group on Facebook for the story…

The greatest divide in American political history was never about race or socioeconomic status. It was – and remains today – the divide between the mercantile/academic elite and the rural commoner.

So as we watch (or don’t, as the case more likely is) the latest manifestations of political “debate” in our nation, what do we see? Whether it’s the funeral(s) for a political figure or the confirmation hearings, what do we see?

Meanwhile, the political kabuki theater that is the confirmation hearing of Judge Kavanaugh drones on with all the elements you would expect. On the one side, Senator Hatch and his annoying monotone voice that makes me want to claw my eardrums out; on the other the incredibly rude and foolish wannabe victims screeching and interrupting the proceedings because that’s what 21st Century political discourse has become. So… what – if anything – did we actually learn on day one of the hearing? There is one thing…

And how that makes you feel says a lot about where you sit on the political spectrum, which has shifted in recent years.

The 9th Circuit weighs in on Homeless people sleeping on the streets in Boise, Idaho. The ruling, in favor of the Homeless people, makes arresting people sleeping on the streets – of Boise – and putting them in a jail cell, feeding them and then releasing them is a violation of the 8th Amendments prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment.

In New Mexico, a USAAC nose gunner finally came home for good. imagine how much the world has changed since that February day in 1944 when he died…

Some of you (and you know who you are) have asked for more information about the Monday show regarding the loss of USS Scorpion. I will admit that I was a bit more philosophical than technical on Monday, but in the event that you have copious free time and would like to do your own review of the material, you can start your journey HERE, HERE, and (mostly) HERE. by the by, HERE is the story of a man who actually did successfully escape from a sunken submarine.


 

The Freshmaker



Despite a very weak voice and the lingering effects of Spring Cold 18, Dave takes a look at the end of World War II and the ways that it could never happen this way in today’s world. Why not? Because we have forgotten why Congress was given the power to declare war, not the President or the political-industrial complex. Read the rest of this entry

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