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The TRIAD


 


A question about submarines and nuclear weapons has Dave off and running on a Friday when pretty everybody is sick and tired of the same old political discussion. So let’s look at some of the history of the Cold war and why we do things the way that we do them…


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Ice Station Zebra



In 1963, Alister McClain published a novel about a spy satellite that fell from orbit and landed in a place where almost nobody could get to it. Almost.

The book and the 1968 film, tell the story of the race by an American atomic-powered attack submarine to get to the ice pack and land a team of Special Ops forces to retrieve the capsule before the weather clears and the Soviets can drop their airborne troops to do the same thing. There are submarines*, spies, confusion, double-crossing, star athletes and Rock Hudson. When everything is said and done, the film canister that everybody is chasing after is destroyed. After all of that effort and blood, nobody had anything.

Which is pretty much a metaphor for the Cold War anyway.

Imagine my surprise to learn – in a completely UNCLASSIFIED manner – that a few years after the novel and the movie, a US spy satellite dropped its film canister out of orbit, only to have its parachute fail and the canister plunge into the deep abyss of the Pacific Ocean**. The race was on to recover it before the Soviets could get wind of the potential intelligence coup and to keep them as in the dark about it as long as possible.

Heading to the scene, an old World War II Salvage Tug dragged a World War II surplus Floating Dry Dock out into the Pacific Ocean**. Inside the dry dock sat one of the most ungainly, misunderstood and surprising pieces of technology ever created. Even as men were walking on the moon, this thing, the Trieste II, was about to dive to depths almost never penetrated before for the sole purpose of recovering a satellite film canister that had landed in the wrong place.

There were a couple of differences from the novel and film. First, it wasn’t in the Arctic. Next, it was not an atomic-powered boat. But the biggest difference of all is that it actually happened.

A real-life Ice Station Zebra…


*The movie contains one of the most nerve-wracking scenes I have ever seen. I can watch it, but it leaves me with heart palpitations and sweating.

**Every “c” in “Pacific Ocean” is pronounced differently. Just thought you’d like to know that. Ever since Kenneth pointed it out to me, I cannot stop thinking about it. 


The Only Thing That We Know




1968 was a bad year for submarines. The French, the Israelis, the Russians, and the United States all lost boats that year. For the US, the loss of Scorpion has proven to be particularly vexing. Even in Submarine School in 1982 it was discussed and debated.

At the end of the day, there are several theories as to what happened. Was it a Russian torpedo in retaliation for the loss of K-129? was it a hot running Mk 37 that couldn’t be shut down and detonated in the torpedo room? Was it a battery that exploded? Why did at least one crew member try to escape?

When everything is said and done, when we think about the loss of 99 men on this day in 1968, there is really only one thing that we know.

And that is that we don’t know…


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