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Not “Happy”



There is one particular thing about the celebration of Memorial Day that doesn’t sit well with me. Would you like to guess what that is?

For all of its flaws, Social Media has given me a gift that I treasure. And on this Memorial Day, that gift seems even more important to me.

The Congress of The United States quietly, without fanfare or real debate, passed the FY2019 National Defense Authorization Act. Trust me, there is nothing in it that will slow or even impeded the ongoing War without end. and, if you happen to be a pessimist, it seems to put the nation on a war footing in the Western Pacific. Meanwhile, the report on Combat in Syria has been released. The main takeaway is that we have spent “Billion” and accomplished almost nothing. But don’t let that stop anybody from continuing to do the same things we’ve been doing…

People are canceling their Netflix subscriptions over the Obama’s being named as executive producers of some new shows?

Say what you will about Social Media, but for me, it’s been a blessing and a way to reconnect with people who really matter to me…


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Memorial Day

 

On this Memorial Day Show, you will hear the inspiring words of John Kennedy and Ronald Reagan; listen as the Guard is changed at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

The Navy Academy Glee Club, Bobby Horton, John Wayne, The Air Force Cadet Chorale and the US Army Choir and Band will move you with music as a reminder of the sacrifice and the legacy of those who have fallen for this nation.

 

 

Two Things (And a Few More)

There’s two things about Memorial Day. First, it honors the fallen. Second, it reminds the living that they have to press on and fulfill the destiny and mission of those who are left behind.

So when one is trying to compress ten plus years of Navy experience into just a few, say three to five, minutes, how does one communicate what that time meant and how it changed a life and a person forever? From learning what to worry about aboard a submarine to why painting bilges actually matters, is there some way to show what it all meant?

The truth is that we look at things differently at 52 years old than we did at 22 years of age. Eyes don’t work as well, limbs don’t move as well, concentration fades and even beltlines seem tighter.

But for all of that, the lessons of those days stick with us in ways that surprise, even after so many years. We mourn the losses, but at noon we raise the flag to full mast.

And we go on in the knowledge that there is a purpose and meaning that transcends the ability to put into words.

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