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CT – The Freedom to Give Advice





Down in Florida, the State ordered a Diet Coach to cease and desist from giving – and charging for – advice to clients on how to lose weight.

On the one hand, the idea that people can’t talk to each other and provide a service for which they are in return paid for that service – in this case, advice about what to eat so as to lose weight – should be a basic cornerstone of libertarian idealism.

On the other hand, the State of Florida disagrees and claims it has a compelling interest in making sure that people who dispense such advice – for money – are up to its standards because 36% of the people who live there are classified as obese. That puts Florida in the middle percentile of the national obesity rankings. So they passed a law to make it a requirement for anybody who gets paid for nutritional advise must have a degree (which you can get from their State-run Universities for the price of a Masters Program! Get a Student loan to cover it!), nine-hundred hours of supervised training and fork over some money for a license.

All of this is to, as they put it, make sure that the people of the State of Florida, who are not capable of making informed choices about nutritional advise on their own, don’t get taken to the cleaners by paying people who have not earned their Masters Degree, taken the training and paid the fee, for their nutritional advice.

Now, the argument being made by the diet coach told to cease and desist is simply that everything she is telling her clients is freely available on the interwebs. Which… is true.

But is that really the argument she should have made?


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Flashback – Top 5 Holiday Films and Specials



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So… here’s the thing. I love doing live radio.

But you already knew that.

Podcasts are great and they are the new way that radio type media is consumed and so even radio shows across the nation are creating podcasts – as I used to do in the KFIV days. Podcasts are here to stay. But there is something particularly satisfying to somebody like me about doing a live show as opposed to a recorded one.

And so I started doing it live a few months ago, and frankly, I am very happy both with the show and the challenge and the way it’s going.

Except for one thing…

My A1C climbed from 6.1 to 9.9 over the course of the time I’ve been live. For those of you who don’t know what that means or don’t worry about your health, it means that my average Blood sugar over the course of the last 90 days is somewhere around 238. That is at least 100 points too high, and the long-term damage it has done as I have battled this since 2014 is starting to become… well… problematic. If you understand Type II diabetes, you already know where I am going.

This is going to kill me if I don’t make some serious – and permanent – changes.

So… changes are a’coming. I desperately want to stay live on the air, but the 10am time slot probably isn’t going to work, so I am going to have to get through the holidays and figure out what will work. It may be early afternoon or evening. But there are a lot of moving parts; Ben, Cami, work, health and even rest, of which I get not nearly enough.

At this point, I have no idea what exactly the change will be – at least as far as the show goes. Cami already got me a Gym Membership for a late Hanukkah gift. My Doctor, a fellow Cold War Veteran determined that the pill based medications aren’t working, so it’s time to start insulin injections.

I’m 55 years old, not 65, or even 75.

I realize that I am being selfish and self-centered. I get that millions upon millions of Americans also have Type II Diabetes, and I know that there are as many circumstances as to causes as there are people. I’ve battled weight issues my whole life, and I have enough injuries and broken parts that every time I move it sounds like a bowl of Rice Krispies. But time is no longer on my side. maybe it’s the advancing of years, but I am starting to notice too many people getting closer and closer to my age who are making the news on the obituary page. It’s getting my attention, and combined with the fact that I’ve been feeling like absolute shit, it’s time to take action.

I am off to more appointments to draw fluids and poke needles into my skin while explaining to me that this will not hurt in any way.

They’re right… it won’t hurt them at all…

Oh… enjoy this throwback to Dave & John giving you their Top 5 Holiday Films and/or TV specials…

Gruber to Garner

“[T]he elasticity of demand for the lowest-income consumers is much higher than for high-income consumers. Hence, government can raise significant revenue through higher cigarette taxes without placing a large net burden on the poor. Indeed, for most parameter values our calculations suggest that tobacco taxes are progressive, at east in the U.S. context, with the self-control benefits through reduced smoking exceeding the higher tax cost for the poor.”

Jonathan Gruber, 2008, “A Modern Economic View of Tobacco Taxation”

e54b5922-b7c4-478d-94d8-17b8cde9fb80@news.ap.orgDo you really understand what that paragraph taken from a Super-Genius Gruber written report prepared for NYC to help justify rising cigarette taxes through the roof implies? It means that the Gruber believes that cigarette taxes are “progressive” – that the taxes effect rich people more than poor people, like income taxes go up as you make more money. It says that he believes that whatever cost is involved in rising taxes on cigarettes will be offset as more and more poor people quit smoking, which rich people will not. The government will then make scads more money and save more money because the poor people who can’t afford health care will not be getting sick from cigarettes and burdening the government with the cost while the rich people will continue to do so and die.

Only, it didn’t quite work out that way for Eric Garner, did it? Read the rest of this entry

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