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Building Pyramids


 


It was an interesting and busy week. Now I am back and ready to get going. There are a few housekeeping things first.

You will notice that the show has switched to SOUNDCLOUD for the audio player. If you download the show via your podcast app, nothing should change. If it does, let me know (HERE) and I will see what went wrong. I believe that this move will give us better flexibility and reporting.

Next up, I was bemused by the Hal Turner Show’s faux outrage over how few people were “supporting” his show. I said this the other day and I say it again now, if you would like to support the show, I am fine with that. I have both Patreon and PayPal links available to assist you. But it will NEVER be a focal point and certainly not a hostage demand. There will NEVER be a charge of any kind to listen to this show or the Podcast 99 Network. That said, if you’d like to shill your product or event, I’m sure that we can work something out!


It’s no big secret that I have a passion for ancient Egyptian history. I have long dreamed of standing before the Sphinx and asking him my question. and as much as I enjoy the history, there remains the eternal argument – how did they build all of this. The answer is simple: one brick at a time.

Today, there is a popular social idea of building pyramids to support one ideology or another. and the truth is that they are not built the same way the ancient Egyptians built theirs. Today’s “pyramids” are less about leaving a monument lasting 10,000 years and more about social engineering and control.


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Crossing the Rubicon



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It’s not much of a secret that I love ancient history. My two favorite periods are from the 18th to the 25th dynasties of Egypt and, even more so, the period of world history from 334bce, when Alexander crossed the Hellespont, through the fall of Jerusalem in 70ce to the soon-to-be Roman Emperor Titus. This period of time, roughly four hundred years, reverberates today.

This was a period of time well known to our forefathers. They were steeped in it, drenched in its philosophical ideas and lessons. They understood the political games and the attempts by despots to rule the world, and how easy it was for there to be manipulation of public opinion when education was lacking.

Four Hundred and thirteen years after Shakespeare, we have been conditioned to see the stories of the lives of the great names in a sympathetic light. Julius Caesar was a benevolent father to his people and he was a tragic figure. Mark Anthony was troubled by the need to avenge the murder of his friend and also spend his life and his personal fortune with his love.

Cleopatra? Of all of them, she has undergone the most serious transformation. Elizabeth Taylor aside, Cleopatra probably wasn’t beautiful, but she was dangerous. Far more dangerous and much more deadly than an Egyptian Asp.

Why does any of this matter?

If Shakespeare can transform these characters from who they really were into their opposites, why is today’s cultural manipulation any different?


Hanno The Navigator




PRODUCER NOTE: Dave is waxing philosophical today. If you’re looking for “news” today, this probably isn’t the place to find it. Plus Alex Ross is on vacation. Fair warning is given! – Producer Henri

Do you know the story of Hanno the Navigator?

Somewhere around the middle of the 5th Century BCE, a Carthaginian leader set out on a voyage to discover new worlds and new civilizations. He boldly went where no man had gone before. His voyage is recorded primarily by a periplus, that is to say, a short record of the stops that he made. The periplus became a record that would give subsequent navigators an idea of what they could expect to find and the distances traveled.

In other words, once upon a long time ago, a man led an expedition of 30,000 people through the Pillars of Hercules and past the edge of the known universe, and instead of some vast rolling epic saga, all we have is a list of the places he visited. In a couple of cases a few notes. Of one of the most epic and important voyages in all of human history, all we know is from a few dots. Hanno changed the world. And seemingly nobody except a few ancient literature scholars and Al Stewart remember anything about him at all. Read the rest of this entry

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