Category Archives: Elections

Catastrophic Failures


 




USS Thresher SSN-593

Yesterday I was asked why I had joined the Navy, and specifically why I volunteered for the Submarine Force. It’s not all that complicated of an answer. I love the sea. I love my country. I love Naval vessels. And a year or so before I joined the Navy, I had read THE book that defines US Submarines service in WWII. Far from scaring me, the promise of joining the best of the best enthralled me and motivated me.

Then came the moment in SUBSCOL when they really ask you if you want to do this. Are you sure?  Because it is very, very, very dangerous.

The tell you the story of the USS Thresher…


What are we to make of the FBI raid on the offices of Trumps lawyer? Is it the “smoking gun” that will lead to impeachment of the President?  Or is it possible that it’s not even connected to the President?


Facebook CEO Mark Zukerburg testifies today in front of Congress. For all the hoopla and brouhaha, is anything likely to change? and will any of those changes be designed to enhance liberty or to restrict it? Moreover, when did Facebook become the ultimate arbiter of election strategy and American day-to-day life?


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Oskar Groening and The Lessons of History


 


 

I have said it many, many times: the biggest error a historian – or anyone appealing to history – can make, is to judge a culture buy their own values and practices.

And yet, every day I hear people who have “studied history” explain to me how the past “got it wrong,” and if only they (the past) had been as smart as the speaker, things would be different – meaning “better” – today. “If I had been there, it would have been done right,” they so often say.

“If I had been there in 1787, we’d have gotten it right!”

Even short term history is treated as if it is an absolute exercise in cause and effect: “The United States didn’t need to drop the atomic bomb. Doing so destabilized the world and led directly to the Cold War.” Read the rest of this entry

Youth Were Never More Sawcie



In the early 1970’s, Congress passed an amendment to the Voting rights act to stop States from limiting who could vote based solely upon their age, specifically for those who were old enough to fight in Vietnam, but not old enough to vote for the leaders who were sending them to Southeast Asia.

Many people objected based on the same old ideas that young people have never been more sawcie and saucie. President Nixon was concerned that the amendment would not pass Constitutional muster, and that might endanger the entirety of the Voting Rights Act. He signed it, but he wasn’t totally onboard with it. Read the rest of this entry

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