Category Archives: WWI

The Hornet’s Sting



On the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle raid, Dave got to visit the USS Hornet Museum. It honors the brave men who flew that daring raid as well as the generations of sailors who served in her after WWII and even today aboard ships with other names, but doing the same job of keeping the peace.

That idea of deterrence and peace through strength is the real reason, despite the apparent confusion of Trump’s Armada, that North Korea and Kim Jong-tun (get it?) decided to not test their atomic weapons last week.

Deterrence works because there is a credible and real threat of retaliation. Ships like USS Hornet and USS Carl Vinson along with their myriad of escorts and support ships provide that deterrent today.

Safety in Numbers



As the debates rolled on, the nation considered many elements of the proposed Constitution. In Rhode Island there was grave concern over the idea that the State would not be able to print its own paper currency. In Virginia the Kentucky Counties worried about the navigational rights on the Mississippi River. But nearly everyone agreed on one issue – the idea that if the nation went to war, it would be stronger united than not.

On April 6, 1917, Congress gathered to vote on whether or not the United States should declare war on Imperial Germany. Four days earlier President Woodrow Wilson had made it clear that the United States was needed and ready for the fight against an evil and depraved monarchy that chose war over peace and threatened the entire world. But, he made he clear, that it would not be, it could not be, his decision alone to send the US into World War I.

Despite the changes in the world since 1787, one thing remained the same. It was that one thing that the Framers had in their prescience foreseen: that no one person should ever be allowed to take the US to war.

The Doubting of the Experts

On December 8th, 1941, President Roosevelt asked Congress to declare War on the Empire of Japan. It is one of the most stirring speeches ever recorded. Congress quickly agreed and except for the standard Conscientious Objector vote, approved the resolution and declared War on Japan.

I go back to the speech itself, which, even if you are not a fan of FDR, is quite stirring, patriotic and appeals to everything that Americans love about their nation. including an appeal to Almighty G-d to see us through to final victory. If you haven’t heard it or watched it, you should do so right now:

In many ways it hearkened back to the speech that FDR had listened to by Woodrow Wilson, who ran in 1916 on a promise to keep America out of the war, then gave what many to consider to be the best speech to call for a Declaration of War ever given by a President. Wilson’s speech left many in tears and screaming with fervor as the nation found itself finally getting into the war which he had promised to keep us out of just months before. Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: