Category Archives: Soviet Union

Ice Station Zebra



In 1963, Alister McClain published a novel about a spy satellite that fell from orbit and landed in a place where almost nobody could get to it. Almost.

The book and the 1968 film, tell the story of the race by an American atomic-powered attack submarine to get to the ice pack and land a team of Special Ops forces to retrieve the capsule before the weather clears and the Soviets can drop their airborne troops to do the same thing. There are submarines*, spies, confusion, double-crossing, star athletes and Rock Hudson. When everything is said and done, the film canister that everybody is chasing after is destroyed. After all of that effort and blood, nobody had anything.

Which is pretty much a metaphor for the Cold War anyway.

Imagine my surprise to learn – in a completely UNCLASSIFIED manner – that a few years after the novel and the movie, a US spy satellite dropped its film canister out of orbit, only to have its parachute fail and the canister plunge into the deep abyss of the Pacific Ocean**. The race was on to recover it before the Soviets could get wind of the potential intelligence coup and to keep them as in the dark about it as long as possible.

Heading to the scene, an old World War II Salvage Tug dragged a World War II surplus Floating Dry Dock out into the Pacific Ocean**. Inside the dry dock sat one of the most ungainly, misunderstood and surprising pieces of technology ever created. Even as men were walking on the moon, this thing, the Trieste II, was about to dive to depths almost never penetrated before for the sole purpose of recovering a satellite film canister that had landed in the wrong place.

There were a couple of differences from the novel and film. First, it wasn’t in the Arctic. Next, it was not an atomic-powered boat. But the biggest difference of all is that it actually happened.

A real-life Ice Station Zebra…


*The movie contains one of the most nerve-wracking scenes I have ever seen. I can watch it, but it leaves me with heart palpitations and sweating.

**Every “c” in “Pacific Ocean” is pronounced differently. Just thought you’d like to know that. Ever since Kenneth pointed it out to me, I cannot stop thinking about it. 


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The Good Old Days



Over the weekend, a Russian destroyer made a run at the USS Chancellorsville, nearly causing a collision between the two ships. This has much of the world in a tizzy, but the reality is that once upon a time this was a fairly common occurrence. If not common, at least not something about which governments and news agencies got their knickers in a wad over.

But the whole thing, along with the return of the Peace Protestors to the gates of Bangor, has Dave reminisces about his own time during the Cold War aboard USS Michigan SSBN-727(G). It was an amazing experience in a beautiful place…


Neo-Soviet Tomf#@*ery



Despite all the hoopla and pearl clutching over the indictment of some Russians for “meddling” in the 2016 elections, I remain unimpressed and unconvinced. These thirteen interlopers did not convince me to not vote for Hillary Clinton.

Hillary Clinton convinced me not to vote for Hillary Clinton.  Read the rest of this entry

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