Category Archives: Federalism

The 2nd Elephant



SEGMENT – “WE MUST DO SOMETHING…”

In the aftermath of Vegas, et al, the call once again becomes “We must do something.”  The problem is, what is something to one person may be nothing to another, and everything to yet another. It all comes down to an understanding of what “reasonable” is. Because what is reasonable to you, may not be to me, and vice versa.

In short, other nations have gone so far as to confiscate guns from citizens. But here in the United States, that would be… problematic at best. So. for the moment, let’s play the “What If?” game. If there were a law which banned all guns, how would those who pass such a law go about enforcing it?

Reference to Constitution Thursday The Saturday Podcast Episode “I Don’t Like Monday’s”

SEGMENT – GERRYMANDERING

In Wisconsin, the State Legislature stands accused of deciding to gerrymander the whole State to favor one Political Party. Now look, this is nothing new. But it is new to have the Supreme Court take up the case and look at whether or not Gerrymandering is in the “best interests of democracy.”

Putting aside the whole “we’re not a democracy” argument for the moment, there actually is a solution to the problem that would make it more challenging (not impossible) to gerrymander, but there is no way on this green planet that the Donkeys and Elephants will ever allow it to happen…

SEGMENT – FRIENDS

A voicemail reminds me of why I love doing these podcasts and shows so very much.

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Language and Perspective



Segment 1 – Welcome to the New Studio!

The experience of buying a home with a “credit challenge” can be stressful beyond belief. The new digs have everything Dave’s ever wanted in a home except for one thing – a Mead Hall.

Segment 2 – “As a Reminder to Future Generations”

After Charlottesville the national scrutiny of Confederate symbols has become acute. Should a monument be eliminated simply because it exists? Or is there a deeper meaning to some of these statues and stones? In the late summer of 1991, I went to Gettysburg. what I found there provides me with my answer and position of the removal of CSA monuments.

Segment 3 – “The Question”

In all of my years in the media, one of the biggest questions I get asked is “Why don’t Jews vote Republican?” There is an answer to that question, and I guarantee that if you are an evangelical Christian republican you will not like it. The interesting thing about it is that it applies to other minority groups as well. And if the GOP really wants to reach those voter groups, they might want to think about how they change their approach…

Never More Divided



Almost daily we are told by some pundit somewhere, that we “have never been more divided.” I think that intellectually we know that isn’t true. But history is past, not always prologue. And without any experiential relationship to it, we find it easy to disconnect from it. We don’t know what happened, except in the broadest of sense, and so it is easy to both ignore its lessons and – like a teenager after a first breakup – believe that nobody could possibly understand what we are going through right now. 

When it comes to the American Civil War of 1861-1865, there are any number of passions, beliefs, arguments, nostalgic wanderings and even warmed over arguments that it’s hard sometimes to keep it all straight. If you want to really start an argument by dropping a grenade into a conversation, just bring up any of the controversial aspects of the Civil War (my personal favorite is, “Could the South have won?”). Then walk over and get your popcorn.

Here we are, one hundred and fifty-two years after the end of the War, and now we have decided that Confederate Monuments need to come down because, hurt feelings. I guess.

Look. I’ll be the second person to say it: Confederate Monuments are the ultimate Participation Trophy. Literally they say “2nd Place, American Civil War.” And while I will also argue that the Confederate States of America was an evil thing in its time, what exactly does tearing down monuments actually accomplish? Supporters of the monuments claim that we can “learn from them.” Fine. Conversely, What is the lesson a person takes away from a statue of Jefferson Davis? 

If education and enlightenment are to be our focus, instead of “feelings” and emotions, when we tear down all of these monuments because, hurt feelings, with what do we replace them? More importantly, when we erase this history, regardless of its stench, what gets reinforced in our corporate minds? That we have never “been more divided?”

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