No Gun Ri & The Syrian Refugees


100-0012_IMGOn July 26-29, 1950, the most famous unit in the US Army, the 7th Cavalry, found itself again facing long odds and an unstoppable enemy. But this time, the lines of who was the enemy and who was an innocent bystander, a refugee, simple trying to escape the horror of war, was not so clear. And in moments of confusion and terror, what happened haunts both the survivors of the 7th Cavalry and the Korean civilians who survived to this day. At a railroad bridge, known as No Gun Ri, the 7th Cavalry found itself in a position of deciding whether to shoot or not. To kill refugees who might be North Korean Troops or not? Orders were issued and the shooting began. 

Today we debate whether or not to accept an influx of Syrian refugees. Refugees that we are all but certain will contain among their numbers those who will attack us, given the opportunity. Do we do the humanitarian thing and accept them with the attendant risk? Or do we reject all of them on the basis that at some point we may have to take action against all of them to root out the evil ones?

More than sixty years after No Gun Ri, we still have questions and confusion. And no clear policy.

But there are more than plenty of questions about it all…

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About Dave

Talk Show host, lifelong Baseball and Star Trek fan, US Navy Submariner and Fire Control Technician (Ballistic Missile) 1st Class Petty Officer (Submarine Qualified), Dave is married with four daughters, one son, two sons-in-law and two grandchildren plus one on the way. He resides quietly in Manteca, CA, where he records his podcast, Plausibly Live, three days a week. He also writes for several other blogs and as a "Stay at home Dad" plays a lot of games with his son. Dave loves books, history and is learning to weld and drive a forklift. Just for fun. Dave is also a Life Member of the Disabled American Veterans and a Member of the US Submarine Veterans.

Posted on November 17, 2015, in History, News & Notes and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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