Day 288 of the Year Twenty & 13


On this Day…

In 1066 Edgar the Ætheling is proclaimed as the king of England, but he never gets crowned. He will die childless some years later as the last member of the original ruling family of England.

In 1764, Edward Gibbon in visiting Rome and observes a group of singing Friars. This will inspire him to write the great “The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.”

In 1783, the first human ascent occurs aboard the Montfgolfier brothers hot air balloon. Their luggage goes to Minneapolis.

In 1863 Horace L. Hunley is killed when his invention, the CSS Hunley, the world first operational combat submarine sinks after an accident. Later it will be determined that Hunley himself makes the fatal error that dooms the crew.

In 1917 Mati Hari is executed for spying for Imperial Germany. In the 1970’s Germany will release documents that show that she had been a spy since 1915.

In 1951 the first episode of I Love Lucy airs on CBS

In 1965 the first public burning of draft cards occurs at a New York City anti-war protest led by the Catholic Worker Movement.

Born this day: Virgil (70bce); Friedrich Nietzsche (1844); John L. Sullivan (1858); Frederick Fleet (1887); Lee Iacocca (1924); Mark Lenard (1924); Barry McGuire (1937); Penny Marshal (1942); Tayna Roberts (1954);

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About Dave

Talk Show host, lifelong Baseball and Star Trek fan, US Navy Submariner and Fire Control Technician (Ballistic Missile) 1st Class Petty Officer (Submarine Qualified), Dave is married with four daughters, one son, two sons-in-law and two grandchildren plus one on the way. He resides quietly in Manteca, CA, where he records his podcast, Plausibly Live, three days a week. He also writes for several other blogs and as a "Stay at home Dad" plays a lot of games with his son. Dave loves books, history and is learning to weld and drive a forklift. Just for fun. Dave is also a Life Member of the Disabled American Veterans and a Member of the US Submarine Veterans.

Posted on October 15, 2013, in History. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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